50s Hairstyles Men

50s Hairstyles Men

The 1950s became a decade of change. The 1950’s era is considered the best time for the hairdressing industry. The 1950’s era created a lot of hairstyles for both males and females. Rock ‘n roll was beginning to be played on radios and jukeboxes, young men began to be more rebellious, and the Cold War was just getting started. One of the features that calls that decade to mind is the array of 1950’s mens hairstyles. Those hairstyles are still worn till that day. The hairstyles back then were influenced by many factors like the rock ‘n’ roll, the cold war, beatniks and the stars of that time like Elvis Presley, James Dean and Troy Donahue. Men’s hairstyles were divided into two far groups: the traditional , short hairstyles and the wild, strange hairstyles. The next hairstyles to talk about is the Ducktail hairstyles. The Ducktail hairstyles appeared one the 1950s men hairstyles stage by Elvis. The ducktail hairstyle is a slick back on the sides, swooped over the top and comes to form a duck tail at the back of the head with its jagged and flipped edges. Those two ways gave us a lot of gorgeous and amazing men hairstyles which are still worn till today. In this article, we have picked up 25 Mens 50s Hairstyles. Let’s take a peek for inspirations.
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50s Hairstyles Men

When it comes to the 1950s the most common association with the time period includes things like rock and roll, greasers, and lots and lots of leather jackets. However, there was far more to the Fifties than just what the adolescents made historically popular. In reality, many businessmen could be seen sporting a more polished, “ivy league” type of fashion sense. Most commonly either slicked back or combed over at the top. Sure, gentlemen from the 50s had long recovered from World War II, however Cold War conflicts were still approaching. In return, fashion for the older male was far more conservative. Things like jackets, trousers, overcoats and formalwear reigned king among the professional man. As did, shorter haircuts and hairstyles. The truth is, not every man in the 1950s wore a pompadour or rebellious cut. To give you a glimpse of the true past, I’ve put together a collection of the top 30 best 1950s hairstyles for men. In this guide you’ll find a few modern takes on the classics as well to discover ideas that still look great in today’s times. If you’re looking for more greaser and rockabilly inspired cuts, don’t worry, I’ve also put together a separate guide. In it, you’ll find more bolder styles with considerably longer lengths and higher volume. With that said, go ahead and enjoy this look into the past. I’m sure you’ll gain plenty of inspiration for your next trip to the barbershop!
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50s Hairstyles Men

Hairstyles for women in the 1950s were diverse, of varying hair lengths, although women older than 20 generally preferred short to medium-length hair. Women generally emulated the hair styles and hair colors of popular film personalities and fashion magazines; top models played a pivotal role in propagating the styles. Alexandre of Paris had developed the beehive and artichoke styles seen on Grace Kelly, Jackie Kennedy, the Duchess of Windsor, Elizabeth Taylor, and Tippi Hedren. Generally, a shorter bouffant style was favored by female movie stars, paving the way for the long hair trend of the 1960s. Very short cropped hairstyles were fashionable in the early 1950s. By mid-decade, hats were worn less frequently, especially as fuller hairstyles like the short, curly “elfin cut” or the “Italian cut” or “poodle cut” and later the bouffant and the beehive became fashionable (sometimes nicknamed B-52s for their similarity to the bulbous noses of the B-52 Stratofortress bomber). Stars such as Marilyn Monroe, Connie Francis, Elizabeth Taylor and Audrey Hepburn usually wore their hair short with high volume. In the poodle hairstyle, the hair is permed into tight curls, similar to the poodle’s curly hair (curling the hair involves time and effort). This style was popularized by Hollywood actresses like Peggy Garner, Lucille Ball, Ann Sothern and Faye Emerson. In the post-war prosperous 1950s, in particular, the bouffant hair style was the most dramatic and considered an ideal style in which aerosol hairspray facilitated keeping large quantities of “backcombed or teased and frozen hair” in place. This necessitated a regimen of daily hair care to keep the bouffant in place; curlers were worn to bed and frequent visits were made to the hair stylist’s salon. Mouseketeer Annette Funicello dramatically presented this hair style in the movie “Beach Party”.
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50s Hairstyles Men

Sure, gentlemen from the 50s had long recovered from World War II, however Cold War conflicts were still approaching. In return, fashion for the older male was far more conservative. Things like jackets, trousers, overcoats and formalwear reigned king among the professional man. As did, shorter haircuts and hairstyles.
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50s Hairstyles Men

50’s male greaser hairstyles were varied, just as the types of men who wore them were. Some were seen as signs of rebellion in young men. Others were seen as conservative and accepted in every setting, including among successful professionals. Their one common thread was the hair cream that was used to hold the hair in place and help the men avoid having to refresh their style during the course of a day. Once styled in the morning, the hair was not moving until the cream was shampooed out.
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50s Hairstyles Men

I found a great product called “Sportin’ Waves”. It’s meant for black men’s hair, but I’m white with very curly hair and it works great. I use this product to create a neat, clean cut, semi-’50s combed-back look, but I’m sure it would be perfect for those radical ducktail/pompadour styles as well. It only costs about $3.25 for a jar of it. It’s a thick, sticky white pomade with a nice, lemony smell. It’s hard to wash out, but that’s probably because it works so well. I wish I knew about these products when I was a kid– I used to put vaseline in my hair to keep it from looking frizzy — Yuk!
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50s Hairstyles Men

Popular music and film stars had a major influence on 1950s hairstyles and fashion. Elvis Presley and James Dean had a great influence on the high quiff-pompadour greased-up style or slicked-back style for men with heavy use of Brylcreem or pomade. The pompadour was a fashion trend in the 1950s, especially among male rockabilly artists and actors. A variation of this was the duck’s ass (or in the UK “duck’s arse”), also called the “duck’s tail”, the “ducktail”, or simply the D.A. This hairstyle was originally developed by Joe Cerello in 1940. Cerello’s clients later included film celebrities like Elvis Presley and James Dean. Frank Sinatra posed in a modified D.A. style of hair. This style required that the hair be combed back around the sides of the head. The tooth edge of a comb was then used to define a central part running from the crown to the nape at the back of the head, resembling, to many, the rear end of a duck. The hair on the top front of the head was either deliberately disarrayed so that untidy strands hung down over the forehead, or combed up and then curled down into an “elephant’s trunk” which might hang down as far as the top of the nose. The sides were styled to resemble the folded wings of the duck, often with heavy sideburns. A variant of the duck’s tail style, known as “the Detroit”, consisted of the long back and sides combined with a flattop. In California, the top hair was allowed to grow longer and combed into a wavelike pompadour shape known as a “breaker”. The duck’s tail became an emblematic coiffure of disaffected young males across the English-speaking world during the 1950s, a sign of rebellious youth and of a “bad boy” image. The style was frowned upon by high school authorities, who often imposed limitations on male hair length as part of their dress codes. Nevertheless, the style was widely copied by men of all ages.
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50s Hairstyles Men

The 1950s was a decade known for experimentation with new styles and culture. Following World War II and the austerity years of the post-war period, the 1950s were a time of comparative prosperity, which influenced fashion and the concept of glamour. Hairstylists invented new hairstyles for wealthy patrons. Influential hairstylists of the period include Sydney Guilaroff, Alexandre of Paris and Raymond Bessone who took French hair fashion to the Hollywood, New York and London, popularising the pickle cut, the pixie cut and bouffant hairstyles.
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The pompadour style became popular among Italian Americans and the image became an integral part of the Italian male stereotype in the 1970s in films such as Grease and television series such as Happy Days. The Fonz, played by Henry Winkler, with his greased pompadour, white T-shirt and leather jacket, has been cited as the “epitome of the 50s bad-boy cool”. In modern Japanese popular culture, the pompadour is a stereotypical hairstyle often worn by gang members, thugs, members of the yakuza and its junior counterpart bōsōzoku, and other similar groups such as the yankii (high-school hoodlums). In Japan the style is known as the “Regent” hairstyle, and is often caricatured in various forms of entertainment media such as anime, manga, television, and music videos.

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